Last edited by Tutaur
Sunday, July 12, 2020 | History

3 edition of The industrial potential of rural Asia found in the catalog.

The industrial potential of rural Asia

R. O. Whyte

The industrial potential of rural Asia

by R. O. Whyte

  • 280 Want to read
  • 4 Currently reading

Published by Centre of Asian Studies, University of Hong Kong in [Hong Kong] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Asia.,
  • Developing countries.
    • Subjects:
    • Rural development -- Asia,
    • Industries -- Asia,
    • Industrial promotion -- Developing countries

    • Edition Notes

      StatementRobert Orr Whyte.
      SeriesCentre of Asian Studies occasional papers and monographs,, no. 51
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHC412 .W44 1982
      The Physical Object
      Pagination300 p. :
      Number of Pages300
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3210493M
      LC Control Number83117161

      The fourth industrial revolution, a term coined by Klaus Schwab, founder and executive chairman of the World Economic Forum, describes a world where individuals move between digital domains and.   The Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR)—characterized by the fusion of the digital, biological, and physical worlds, as well as the growing utilization of new technologies such as artificial.

        Environmental degradation, unstable oil prices in the international market, global warming, and the social crisis in the Niger Delta area, where the bulk of Nigeria's crude oil is extracted, have further made the choice of RE potential of RE in Nigeria is about times that of fossil energy resources; in energy , solar, biomass and wind have significant potential.   The rural economy holds significant potential for creating decent and productive jobs and contributing to sustainable development and economic growth. It accounts for a significant share of employment and output in many developing countries but is widely characterized by severe decent work deficits and poverty, hosting nearly 80 per cent of the.

      Agriculture is the science and art of cultivating plants and livestock. Agriculture was the key development in the rise of sedentary human civilization, whereby farming of domesticated species created food surpluses that enabled people to live in cities. The history of agriculture began thousands of years ago. After gathering wild grains beginning at least , years ago, nascent farmers. Rural marketing has become the latest mantra of most corporate. Companies like Hindustan Lever, Colgate Palmolive, Britannia and even Multinational Companies (MNCs) like Pepsi, Coca Cola, L.G., Philips, Cavin Kare are all eyeing rural markets to capture the large Indian market. Coming to the frame work of Rural Marketing, Rural Marketing broadly.


Share this book
You might also like
Elementary probability for the biological sciences

Elementary probability for the biological sciences

Crop-tree thinning a 50-year-old western larch stand

Crop-tree thinning a 50-year-old western larch stand

Nepalese inscriptions in Gupta characters.

Nepalese inscriptions in Gupta characters.

The duel masters official guidebook.

The duel masters official guidebook.

Potters, a study of two villages in Ethiopia

Potters, a study of two villages in Ethiopia

Hadith

Hadith

The lions choice

The lions choice

measurement of b-quark fragmentation fractions in p̄p collisions at (s)1/2=1.8 TeV.

measurement of b-quark fragmentation fractions in p̄p collisions at (s)1/2=1.8 TeV.

abstraction and index to Burke County, North Carolina, inventories of sales of estates, 1832-1838

abstraction and index to Burke County, North Carolina, inventories of sales of estates, 1832-1838

Children of the slaves.

Children of the slaves.

Twelfth night

Twelfth night

science of fluids

science of fluids

Thec ase of the hook-billed kites

Thec ase of the hook-billed kites

The industrial potential of rural Asia by R. O. Whyte Download PDF EPUB FB2

The industrial potential of rural Asia. [R O Whyte] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Contacts Search for a Library.

Create Book\/a>, schema:CreativeWork\/a> ; \u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\n library. A study of rural Asia was undertaken by the Asian Development Bank and this book, along with four other volumes in the series, presents an analysis and assessment of the achievements, problems and prospects in rural Asia.

The authors of this book acknowledge an economic transformation that has taken place in much of rural Asia over the past two decades and Cited by: An economic transformation has occurred in much of rural Asia during the last two decades.

Large parts of the region have made remarkable progress with substantial gains in food security, per capita income, quality of life, and poverty reduction.

Yet, rural Asia remains home to million people living in poverty, many of whom have no access to safe water and sanitation. Viewed mainly as the growth of manufacturing sector as opposed to agriculture and the increased use of inanimate sources of power in the production of goods and services, rural industrialization offers the greatest scope for absorbing the existing and growing labour force outside the field of agriculture.

However, rural industrial scene continues to be characterised by the concentration of. The rural economy is multi-sectoral and includes not only agriculture but many other dimensions as well such as livestock, fisheries, agro-industry, natural resources, etc. Therefore investments in the rural economy need to be promoted.

Such investments are: ethically justified, as a bulk of the poor in South Asia is living in the rural areas. This reveals a need to refresh the concepts we use to understand, measure and describe rural communities and their development potential. This book argues that.

and the rural economy as a whole for perhaps 60 per cent of the total. Agricultural exports accounted for around 60 per cent of exports. By the end of the s, these figures had generally halved at least, more in East Asia, less in sub-Saharan Africa.

(Maxwell) 8. Rural areas are more integrated into the world economy, as a result both of. the best way of rural development, though it may lead to a wnsidarable growth in industrial output4.

Rural industrialization facilitates shifts in work force from primary to secondary sectors. Industrialization promotes an economy fundamentally relying on agriculture into a more advanced industrial economy6.

The rural market of India started showing its potential in the s. The 70s and 80s witnessed its steady development.

And, there are clear indications that the 21st century is going to see its full blossoming. In our country, where research on consumer behaviour has been nominal, not much systematized information is.

India is predominantly a rural country with two third population and 70% workforce residing in rural areas. Rural economy constitutes 46 per cent of national income.

Despite the rise of urbanisation more than half of India‟s population is projected to be rural by Conventional wisdom explains the remarkable growth of Chinese rural industry after in terms of changes in economic policy; that rural industrialization took off through a combination of privatization, liberalization, and fiscal decentralization.

This book takes issue with such claims. Using a newly-constructed dataset covering China’s 2, counties and complemented by a detailed. industrial raw materials, manpower and electricity. (4) Initiation of a process of 'skill-formation' among the rural people generally, and among rural artisans in particular, so that more pro­ ductive, modern techniques are popularised in rural areas, (5) Stimulation of local savings and capital formation and in­ culcation of a spirit of indus­.

The expansion of industry into rural areas has been particularly intense in Asia (notably in China, Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Taiwan) and Latin America (especially Mexico, Paraguay, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic), as well as in the less-developed countries of southern Europe (Greece, Portugal, Turkey, and to a lesser.

Rural IndustryUntil the introduction of cotton in the late eighteenth century, wool and linen were the raw materials from which cloth was woven in Ireland. For more than a century, skilled craftsmen were concentrated in Dublin and the country towns under the patronage of local landowners, but in the countryside many people prepared the raw materials, spun yarn, wove coarse cloths, and sold.

The global average is dominated by Asia. Within Asia, the sub-regional averages range from about 35 percent in South Asia to almost 50 percent in East and Southeast Asia. The Asian average is dominated by China, where the female share of the agricultural labour force.

APO Seminar on Promotion of Rural-based Small Industries ( Tehran, Iran) Promotion of rural-based small industries in Asia and the Pacific. Tokyo: Asian Productivity Organization, (OCoLC) Material Type: Conference publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors.

- The Industrial Potential of Rural Asia. By Robert Orr Whyte. By Robert Orr Whyte. Hong Kong: University of Hong Kong (Centre of Asian Studies Occasional Papers and Monographs, No.

51), vii, pp. Bibliography, Index of Subjects, Index of Geographical Names. CiteScore: ℹ CiteScore: CiteScore measures the average citations received per peer-reviewed document published in this title. CiteScore values are based on citation counts in a range of four years (e.g. ) to peer-reviewed documents (articles, reviews, conference papers, data papers and book chapters) published in the same four calendar years, divided by the number of Missing: industrial potential.

Search the world's most comprehensive index of full-text books. My libraryMissing: industrial potential. However, growth in the capacity of cities to accommodate industrial growth seems to be flattening.

With a rising middle class and booming demand for automobiles, Asian cities can expect no relief from congestion, and this may be a deterrent for businesses. Rural areas are increasingly prepared to absorb this potential shift in demand. Close economic integration of rural areas with neighbouring urban areas and the creation of rural off-farm employment can narrow rural-urban disparities, expand opportunities and encourage the retention of skilled people, including youth, in rural areas.

There is considerable potential for rural job creation not only in farming, agro processing.the demand for, farm products.

Agro-industries have the potential to provide employment for the rural population not only in farming, but also in off-farm activities such as handling, packaging, processing, transporting and marketing of food and agricultural products.

There are clear indications that agro-. Rural population (% of total population) - Asia. Definition: Rural population refers to people living in rural areas as defined by national statistical offices.

It is calculated as the difference between total population and urban population. Description: The map below shows how Rural population (% of total population) varies by country in Asia.

The shade of the country corresponds to the Missing: industrial potential.